Prometheus: Vol 33, No 3 (2015)

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Editorial
By Stuart Macdonald page: 213 - 214 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 33, Issue 3 SKU: 0810-90281215061
Paper
By Sotaro Shibayama Honesty in scientific publication is critical for scientific advancement, but dishonesty is commonly and increasingly observed in misconduct and other questionable practices. Focusing on dishonest conformity in peer review, in which authors unwillingly obey referees’ instructions in order to have their papers accepted even if the instructions contradict the authors’ scientific belief, the current study aims to investigate the determinants of dishonesty. Drawing on survey data of Japanese life scientists, this study shows that the conflict between authors and referees in peer review is common. A majority of scientists follow referees’ instructions rather than refute them. The results suggest that conformity occurs more frequently (1) in biology than in medicine and agriculture, (2) when authors are in strong scientific competition, (3) if authors are associate professors rather than full professors, (4) if authors have no foreign research experience, and (5) in low-impact journals rather than in medium-impact journals. page: 215 - 233 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 33, Issue 3 SKU: 0810-90281114745
Paper
By Kyriakos Drivas This paper uses detailed data on funding information and research output from the Agricultural University of Athens to examine how each type of funding source is related to the quantity and quality of academic research output. Of special interest are private, Greek government and European Union sources of funding. We find that after controlling for unobserved heterogeneity from each research laboratory, all types of research funding are similarly related to both the count of publications and citations. Further, we find that research laboratories that have filed for at least one patent application produce more publications and citations to their work, indicating that laboratories that are close to industry are also engaged actively in research. page: 235 - 256 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 33, Issue 3 SKU: 0810-90281150575
Paper
By Josephine Warren Gaps or deficits in knowledge present opportunities for new and innovative research, but when studies are undone much is lost. The concept of ‘undone science’ can be understood within related concepts, including ignorance, nescience, non-knowledge and the chilling effect. The Tasmanian devil cancer, devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), is a new and novel cancer, potentially providing many opportunities for innovative research. The contagious cancer hypothesis for DFTD is also novel. In the research it has sponsored, the Tasmanian government elected to follow this pathway, neglecting an alternative plausible hypothesis that toxins in the devils’ environment may have played a role in the initiation or progression of the cancer. The studies were not viewed as opportunities to fill gaps in devil cancer knowledge, and remain undone. page: 257 - 276 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 33, Issue 3 SKU: 0810-90281168202
Paper
By Laia Miralles-Vazquez For many multinational corporations (MNCs), sustainable competitive advantage resides in an MNC’s ability to innovate; that is, to create new knowledge, integrate it with an existing knowledge base and exploit the resulting knowledge bundles across national borders. Traditionally, a key mechanism by which knowledge is transferred across borders and recombined works through expatriate assignments. There is, however, a growing trend towards alternative forms of international assignments, such as flexpatriates, commuters, frequent flyers and self-initiated expatriates. We ask how the use of such non-traditional international assignments affects knowledge creation and transfer in MNCs and hence innovation, which we construe as both idea generation and implementation. Our exploratory study draws on the experiences of five women living in Spain who undertook various forms of international assignment in MNCs with differing administrative heritages, working in consultancy and engineering fields. Our findings point to variations in the type and quality of knowledge generated across different forms of international assignments, and draw attention to the socially embedded, informal interactions underpinning much knowledge transfer and recombination. Our findings are also suggestive of a gendered element to knowledge creation and transfer, and how these activities may be perceived by the senior management of MNCs. Our concluding conjecture is that within each form of international assignment, women’s contributions to the innovative efforts of MNCs may have somewhat less to do with formal management practices, and may even, at times, be in spite of them. page: 277 - 303 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 33, Issue 3 SKU: 0810-90281122952
Paper
By Omer Yezdani This paper explores a model-centred approach to augment the development and refinement of the theory of emergence. Its focus is on the relational process of leadership as an emergent event in complex human organisations. Emergence in complex organisations is a growing field of inquiry with many remaining research opportunities, yet a number of its central themes continue to be loosely connected to practical application and reliant on equivocal translations from root meaning. This paper offers a novel model of semantic conceptualisation of theory and phenomena with simulations to strengthen the theory–model–phenomenon link, building on the work of previous authors. Strengthening this link yields numerous applications, including making sense of complex organisational dynamics and supporting a wide range of theory-building research methods in applied social science and interdisciplinary research. The paper begins with a reflection on the main ideas of the theory of emergence, followed by discussion on prevalent model-centred approaches. A programme of semantic conceptualisation to expand real-world application of the theory of emergence is proposed. page: 305 - 322 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 33, Issue 3 SKU: 0810-90281144669
Book Review
By Janet Harris page: 323 - 325 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 33, Issue 3 SKU: 0810-90281207861
Book Review
By Donald Hislop page: 325 - 327 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 33, Issue 3 SKU: 0810-90281207862
Book Review
By Richard Joseph page: 327 - 330 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 33, Issue 3 SKU: 0810-90281207864
Book Review
By Miguel Pina e Cunha page: 330 - 334 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 33, Issue 3 SKU: 0810-90281207866
Book Review
By Richard Joseph page: 334 - 337 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 33, Issue 3 SKU: 0810-90281215062