Prometheus: Vol 32, No 1 (2014)

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Editorial
By Stuart Macdonald page: 1 - 2 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028975563
Paper
By Sherry S. Marcellin After almost a decade of civil society (CS) efforts aimed at reforming the global intellectual property (IP) system, this study examines whether the paucity in global copyright reform is a result of the failure by civil society to mobilise around an explicit or coherent frame. While previous episodes of global intellectual property rights (IPR) reform advocacy involving CS were effectively contested under a human rights frame, there have been less successful framing attempts in the space of copyright reform advocacy. Using semi-structured interviews with key civil society stakeholders involved in the reform of the global copyright system, the study explores possible explanations for this lapse in framing in copyright reform advocacy. It also questions the extent to which framing has been an intelligible lens through which to understand the success or failure of global IPR advocacy. It reveals that frame analysis does not comprehensively capture success or failure in global IPR policymaking. Lastly, the study looks at problems with civil society and what these mean for copyright reform and ultimately the future of the global IPR system. page: 3 - 22 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028949424
Paper
By Lisa J. Daniel Innovation is said to be the key to future markets, business development and economic growth, yet the concept of innovation remains abstract and ambiguous. This paper suggests any value creation intentions need to recognise that innovation is a context-dependent process which is implicitly and fundamentally informed through the social agendas and consensus of those involved. To inform this social perspective of innovation value creation, we ask, how does the ‘sociology of innovation’ influence value creation? Using a ‘sociology of innovation’ standpoint, a qualitative study of participants in Australian bioindustry research and development (R&D) was undertaken to explore how the various socio-contextual frameworks and dominant outcome intentions were involved in value creation in the development of new biotechnological innovations. Through the two themes of context and community, we reveal how value creation was shaped by dynamic social processes involving multiple stakeholders and diverse perspectives of innovation. This research improves our understanding of how those involved in innovation development negotiate a complex social milieu of interpretive schemas to leverage various aspects of value creation. These findings present insights to managers and policy makers seeking to advance innovation value and advantages. page: 23 - 47 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028956504
Paper
By Bridgette Wessels This paper explores key issues in the development of open access to research data. The use of digital means for developing, storing and manipulating data is creating a focus on ‘data-driven science’. One aspect of this focus is the development of ‘open access’ to research data. Open access to research data refers to the way in which various types of data are openly available to public and private stakeholders, user communities and citizens. Open access to research data, however, involves more than simply providing easier and wider access to data for potential user groups. The development of open access requires attention to the ways data are considered in different areas of research. We identify how open access is being unevenly developed across the research environment and the consequences this has in terms of generating data gaps. Data gaps refer to the way data becomes detached from published conclusions. To address these issues, we examine four main areas in developing open access to research data: stakeholder roles and values; technological requirements for managing and sharing data; legal and ethical regulations and procedures; institutional roles and policy frameworks. We conclude that problems of variability and consistency across the open access ecosystem need to be addressed within and between these areas to ensure that risks surrounding a data gap are managed in open access. page: 49 - 66 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028956505
Paper
By Roel Rutten Roel Rutten is assistant professor at the School of Social and Behavioural Sciences of Tilburg University and has worked as a consultant of regional innovation policy. His research interests include innovation and organization and the geography of innovation and learning. He is a founding member of the Social Dynamics of Innovation Networks research community and an active member of the Regional Studies Association. He frequently engages with practitioners in the field of innovation and regional development. page: 67 - 74 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028945291
Paper
By James Faulconbridge James Faulconbridge is Professor of Transnational Management at Lancaster University. His research focuses upon the globalisation of professional service firms. Recent articles have examined the nature of stretched communities of learning in such firms, and institutional effects on globalising firms. He is co-author of and editor of . page: 75 - 82 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028945289
Paper
By Elena P. Antonacopoulou Elena P. Antonacopoulou is Professor of Organizational Behaviour at the University of Liverpool Management School where she leads GNOSIS, a research initiative advancing collaborative research in management and organization studies. Her principal research interests include change, learning and knowledge practices in organizations, and the development of new methodologies for studying social complexity. She has successfully secured government and corporate funding that supported a series of international research projects on organizational learning, social practice and dynamic capabilities. page: 83 - 91 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028945286
Paper
By Alice Lam Alice Lam is Professor of Organisation Studies at the School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London. Her research focuses on the relationship between organizational forms, knowledge creation and societal institutions. Her current work examines the changing nature of academic scientific work and knowledge transfer between university and industry. page: 93 - 99 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028945290
Paper
By Patrick Cohendet Patrick Cohendet was previously dean of the Faculty of Economics at Strasbourg University (1982–1985), vice president of the University of Strasbourg (1991–1992), member of the Conseil des Applications de l’Académie des Sciences in Paris (1994–2002), and chairman of the International Business Department at HEC Montréal (2007–2008). He was also visiting professor at the University of Virginia, and the University of Tokyo. His research interests include the theory of the firm, economics of innovation, economics of knowledge, economics of creativity and knowledge management. page: 101 - 104 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028945288
Paper
By Marc D. Bahlmann Marc Bahlmann is assistant professor at VU University Amsterdam. He received his Ph.D. from the Faculty of Social Sciences (VU University) for a study on knowledge dynamics among IT entrepreneurs located in the Amsterdam IT and new media cluster. His current research interests include alliance portfolios, organizational and regional innovation. page: 105 - 110 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028945287
Book Review
By Alberto Nucciarelli page: 111 - 113 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028949425
Book Review
By Huatao Peng page: 113 - 118 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028949423
Book Review
By Bert Sadowski page: 118 - 121 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028949426
Book Review
By Bert Sadowski page: 121 - 124 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 1 SKU: 0810-9028949427