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Prometheus
Volume 37 Issue 2 June 2021

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Editorial
By Stuart Macdonald Prometheus has never had any truck with the citation counts and journal impact factors which are supposed to reveal which are the very best journals and, by implication, the very best papers with the very best authors. Nor has Prometheus any time for h-indices and the myriad of other statistical convolution purporting to identify academic excellence. They have no reputable purpose and are damaging to scholarly endeavour, particularly as they can all be gamed. Competitive higher education expects academics to game the indicators of academic performance, and the greater the gaming, the more yet further gaming is required to remain competitive. Do any academics write without an eye to performance measures? page: 221 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 37, Issue 3 SKU: 370301
Paper
By Peter Senker Economic activities continue to cause considerable environmental damage. The extent of damage could be such that the environment in and around our planet will be affected, making survival difficult for human beings, for other animals, and for plants and insects. The paper reviews economic developments from the nineteenth century and how these have been influenced by orthodox economic theories. Markets are central to orthodox economics, and to policies which have been implemented recently to restrict global warming. Since the 1980s, policies based on orthodox economics and neoliberalism have been widely implemented by governments, and also by international organizations. Such policies are evaluated and found to be seriously inadequate. Studies of environmental implications of the development of two major sectors of the world economy follow. Policies which are concerned only to restrain climate change are unlikely to be adequate by themselves. Policies which take a holistic approach to considering all the important impacts of human economic activity on the environment have greater prospects of success. The paper concludes by suggesting research and analysis be undertaken urgently to assist with the design and implementation of more effective policies to reduce the damage to the environment caused by human economic activities. page: 223 - 240 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 37, Issue 3 SKU: 370302
Paper
By Luke Hendrickson, David Taylor, Lyndon Ang, Kay Cao, Thai Nguyen and Franklin Soriano This paper assesses the contribution of innovation persistence to surviving Australian firm growth performance over the period 2007–08 to 2013–14 with the added advantages that new firms, micro-sized firms and all industry sectors are included in our analysis. Over this period, firms with high sales and/or employment growth accounted for the majority of aggregate economic and employment growth in Australia, which is consistent with similar studies in other countries. Using a randomized, stratified sample from a firm population-level database that links administrative, tax and survey data, we created a matched, balanced sample of surviving firms to show that short-term persistent innovators (particularly young SMEs) significantly outgrow their less persistent and non-innovator counterparts in terms of sales, value added, employment and profit growth. Persistent innovators are more likely to be high-growth firms and more likely to introduce multiple types of innovation that are more novel. Our findings suggest that broad-based innovation policies may support successive waves of high-growth firms that help to sustain economic and employment growth in Australia. page: 241 – 258 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 37, Issue 3 SKU: 370303
Paper
By Avinash Shivdas, Saswata Barpanda, Soumya Sivakumar and Ram Bishu Firms in emerging markets are rapidly developing frugal innovation capabilities (FICs) in order to harness the growth potential of these markets. Researchers have explored this frugal innovation phenomenon through case studies of such firms. This nascent domain of study has been growing, and the demand for a specialized focus on FICs and their measurement is strong. This paper aims to satisfy the demand by conceptualizing FICs using the theoretical framework of dynamic capability, developing a measurement scale, and empirically validating the scale to measure FICs. Data from the medical device and automobile sectors in India were applied for this purpose. It is proposed that FICs are a composite variable with four dimensions: value for money, acceptable quality, scalability and marketability. The confirmatory factor analysis results validate these dimensions, presenting a gateway to explore FICs and their applications. page: 259 – 285 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 37, Issue 3 SKU: 370304
Book Review
By Filippo Barbera The Trust Revolution by M. Todd Henderson and Salen Churi (2019) 232pp., €72 (hardback) Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, ISBN 9781108494236 page: 286 – 287 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 37, Issue 3 SKU: 370305
Book Review
By Fabio Tollon Cyber Republic by George Zarkadakis (2020), 216pp., $US27 (hardcover) MIT Press, Cambridge MA, ISBN 978-0-26-204431-8 page: 288 – 292 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 37, Issue 3 SKU: 370306
Book Review
By Henrik Skaug Sætra Power and Technology: A Philosophical and Ethical Analysis by Faridun Sattarov (2019) 198pp., $US120 (hardback) Rowman & Littlefield, London, ISBN 978-1-78661-130-7 page: 293 – 299 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 37, Issue 3 SKU: 370307
Book Review
By Emilio Collar Jr Artificial Intelligence as a Disruptive Technology: Economic Transformation and Government Regulation by Rosario Girasa (2020) 331pp., €68 (paperback) Palgrave Macmillan, London, ISBN 978-3-030-35975-1 page: 300 – 302 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 37, Issue 3 SKU: 370308
Book Review
By Richard Joseph The Market in Mind: How Financialization Is Shaping Neuroscience, Translational Medicine and Innovation in Biotechnology by Mark Dennis Robinson (2019) xiv + 309pp., $US40.00 (paperback) MIT Press, Cambridge MA, ISBN 978-0-262-53687-5 page: 303 – 305 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 37, Issue 3 SKU: 370309
Book Review
By Luigi Oddo Capital, Investment and Innovation in the Roman World edited by Paul Erdkamp, Koenraad Verboven and Arjan Zuiderhoek (2020) 512pp., £100 (hardback) Oxford University Press, Oxford, ISBN: 9780198841845 page: 306 – 310 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 37, Issue 3 SKU: 370310
Book Review
By Michel Bourban Innovation, Ethics and Our Common Futures: A Collaborative Philosophy by Rafael Ziegler (2020) 193pp., £75 (hardback) Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, ISBN: 978 1 78990 453 6 page: 311 – 314 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 37, Issue 3 SKU: 370311