Prometheus: Vol 32, No 4 (2014)

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Editorial
By Martin Meyer page: 319 - 320 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 4 SKU: 0810-90281127047
Paper
By Helen Lawton Smith Understanding how economies change through interactions with science and government as different spheres of activity requires both new conceptual tools and methodologies. In this paper, the evolution of the metaphor of a Triple Helix of university–industry–government relations is elaborated into an evolutionary model, and positioned within the context of global economic changes. We highlight how Triple Helix relations are both continuing and mutating, and the conditions under which a Triple Helix might be seen to be unraveling in the face of pressures on each of the three helices – university, industry, and government. The reciprocal dynamics of innovation both in the Triple Helix thesis and in the global economy are empirically explored: we find that footlooseness of high technology manufacturing and knowledge-intensive services counteract the embeddedness prevailing in medium technology manufacturing. The geographical level at which synergy in Triple Helix relations can be expected and sustained varies among nations and regions. page: 321 - 336 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 4 SKU: 0810-9028972135
Paper
By T. Hughes The objective of the paper is to demonstrate how the theoretical ideas of service-dominant logic (S-D logic) can usefully be applied to innovation through collaboration among university, industry and government. The debate around S-D logic has stimulated much discussion of three areas that are particularly pertinent in considering the co-creation of knowledge within the Triple Helix. The first area relates to understanding the nature of the resources provided by all the parties involved and the process through which they are integrated. The second area relates to interaction among the parties involved. The third and most complex area relates to how value is perceived by the different parties. This discussion leads to a proposed model of the co-creation process and four suggested research agendas: Research Agenda One, looking at the resources supplied by the parties and their integration; Research Agenda Two, concerning the interaction practices that enhance co-creation; Research Agenda Three, exploring what value propositions will motivate the different parties to co-create; and Research Agenda Four, considering how co-creation modifies the resources of the parties involved. A model of the co-creation process that encompasses these four research agendas and provides a conceptual framework to analyse Triple Helix initiatives is proposed. Some practical implications are then discussed relating to the challenges posed for researchers. page: 337 - 350 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 4 SKU: 0810-9028971613
Paper
By Kevin Grant page: 351 - 368 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 4 SKU: 0810-90281110425
Paper
By Henry Etzkowitz Our attention in this paper is to the relationship between society and science in science-based innovation processes. We propose that citizens’ and scientists’ actions are interlaced and that civil society provides a platform on which novel approaches to innovation may be formed. The empirical focus is set on stem cells and regenerative medicine in California, and the emergence of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). In an effort to advance the area, a coalition of actors went beyond conventional roles and ventured into a broader realm of ‘innovation in innovation’, creating a new financial and organizational model. This has played out in a number of interesting and fruitful ways, and implications can be drawn for innovation policy and practice. page: 369 - 384 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 4 SKU: 0810-90281126984
Paper
By Annamária Inzelt Central and East European countries (CEECs) still show many features of the Soviet era. Consequently, the region seems, in several ways, to have been shaped by a single universal phase of transformation. This explains, at least in part, the relatively weak patenting activities and innovation performance of these countries. This paper deals with quantitative information originating from a newly created databank and investigates CEECs, employing various patent indicators in a Triple Helix context. page: 385 - 401 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 4 SKU: 0810-90281126982
Paper
By Mark Gilman With university–industry engagement forming an integral part of the policy agenda, this paper underlines current issues and emerging themes in the dedicated literature. It utilises a comprehensive literature review, based on evidence from peer-reviewed journals/public reports published after 2005 in the UK. The paper integrates a wide range of disparate studies on university–industry knowledge transfer patterns, determinants and impacts, and offers a panorama that could be useful to inform on the variety of issues underlying knowledge transfer. Given the importance/complexity of university–industry interactions, a comprehensive study fills an existing gap. Second, due to its focus on current issues, the study opens the way to reflections and debates on critically ‘unanswered’ questions: how to deal with diversity/heterogeneity? How to increase quality in supply/quantity in demand for knowledge? How to increase impact on academics, universities, firms, economy and society? page: 403 - 439 Prometheus: Critical Studies in Innovation Volume 32, Issue 4 SKU: 0810-90281046715